05.20.08

Automated Content Alerting

Posted in Coding, ImplicitWeb, Orchestr8, Protocols at 10:15 am by elliot

Too many websites. Too little syndication.

This is a theme that’s been bouncing around my subconscious for months; something I’ve blogged about in the past.

But really, syndication is only part of the problem. Syndication normalizes data, and makes it readily accessible to 3rd parties — but it doesn’t push data where you want it. It’s a pull-focused technology.

For push, we need some sort of alerting capability.

Recently, I’ve been in the habit of checking delegate counters for the 2008 Presidential Election Primary Races. I check them daily; seeing updates to pledged delegates, super-delegates, etc.

Checking for updates doesn’t take a significant amount of time, but it’s yet another activity that can conceivably interrupt my work flow. Leveraging of automation would be a much better way to do this.

Recently, my company added Alerts capability to our AlchemyGrid beta service. You can create an alert based on anything — any sort of web content (syndicated or not). Alerts can travel over many communications mediums (Email, AIM, SMS, Twitter, etc.). They support lots of customization options (regarding how often to check for updates, what’s considered a “unique update”, etc.).

I used this new service to create an Alert that monitors delegate counts for the Democratic Presidential candidates (GOP has already chosen their candidate). Any updates to delegate counts are automatically posted to the twitter account “demdelegate08″. You can see the Twitter feed (and follow it if you wish) here:

http://twitter.com/demdelegate08

If you aren’t a Twitter user, and are interested in getting delegate updates via Email, SMS, or AIM, you can “Subscribe to / Follow” my Alert here:

DCW Delegate Alert

A few implementation notes, for the geeks out there: We’re using a custom-engineered AIM, Email, and SMS backend for our Alerts implementation. We’re interacting with external services directly at the Protocol/API level, not piggy-backing off 3rd-party gateways or using other unreliable modes of communication.

05.15.08

New Sidebar Widget

Posted in Clipping, Contextual, ImplicitWeb, NLP, Orchestr8, Uncategorized, Widgets at 9:02 am by elliot

I’ve just added a new sidebar widget to my blog: “Related Content”.

This is a demonstration of “contextual widgets” from my company’s AlchemyGrid service.

Contextual widgets utilize a custom-engineered “statistical topic keyword extraction from Natural Language Text” facility we’ve recently integrated into our products. If you’re familiar with the “Yahoo Term Extraction” API, our system is essentially doing the same sort of stuff. Natural language processing is fun (and challenging) stuff. Here’s a few notes regarding our implementation:

1. AlchemyGrid’s Term Extraction facility supports multiple languages (English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, and Russian!). This was an important requirement for us, to enable contextual content generation for non-English websites/blogs. There are significant differences between languages in terms of punctuation rules, word stemming, and other details. Hats off to our Term Extraction developers, you’ve done a great job ensuring good initial language coverage.

2. Our Term Extraction facility is entirely statistical in its basis, not using a hard-coded lexicon, etc. This enables it to extract contextually-relevant topic keywords even when they’re (a) new topics, (b) rarely used common nouns/people-names, or (c) misspelled.

We’ve just integrated Term Extraction into our Grid service, so there may be a few minor kinks to work out in the coming weeks — but overall we’re happy with the initial results. Contextual capability vastly expands the utility of AlchemyGrid widgets, as their content can now be automatically customized to relate to your content. This applies to *any* input-enabled widget in the grid (ALL widgets are contextual). Here’s another contextual example (a related Amazon book):

We’ll be enabling the other supported languages in coming weeks, as well as rolling out some additional enhancements to our text processing algorithms (for the geeks in the audience, enhancements to our sentence boundaries detector, inline punctuation processor, etc.).