04.09.14

Posted in Uncategorized at 6:00 am by elliot

WASHINGTON (CNN) — David who? was the initial reaction of Americans to a little-known judge from New Hampshire named in 1990 to sit on the nation’s highest court. Even the nominee didn’t know what to think when President George H.W. Bush called him with the news, telling supporters, “I was in a state of virtual shock.”

Conservatives say Supreme Court Justice David Souter, nominated by a Republican, was a dissapointment.

Conservatives say Supreme Court Justice David Souter, nominated by a Republican, was a dissapointment.

Now, more than 18 years later, Souter plans to retire after the current term recesses in June, a source close to Souter told CNN.

David Hackett Souter had only been on a federal appeals court bench for a few months when he was tapped to replace liberal lion William Brennan, a choice many Republicans hoped would move the high court rightward and reshape American law.

“I think that is good news for all of us who are committed to the Constitution of the United States,” said Bush. “He’ll be a superb justice for the Supreme Court.”

In reality, Souter was in many ways a typical, old-fashioned Yankee Republican — a moderate with an independent, even quirky streak. Whether he became more liberal in his views after joining the Supreme Court, as many conservatives believe, may depend on your politics.

“Justice Souter will never escape the label of having been an enormous disappointment, a traitor to the right,” said Thomas Goldstein, a Washington appellate attorney and founder of Scotusblog.com. “It instead created the opportunity to entrench a series of more liberal rulings. So he became the right’s greatest failure and we will forever hear the mantra ‘No More Souters’ from conservatives.”

Colleagues dismiss suggestions that liberal colleagues on the bench helped move Souter to the left.

“I find that incredibly unbelievable,” said Rebecca Tushnet, a former Souter law clerk and professor at Georgetown Law Center. “He was faced with different issues on the Supreme Court than he was as a state official. A Supreme Court justice requires you to make different decisions, ones that aren’t always consistent with your politics. And remember the Republican Party of Nixon is a different party than the one we have today, and we have a number of judges who came out of that earlier Republican Party who may not be in line with the priorities of people in power in Republican circles today.”

The stealth candidate

Souter had a long career in public service. He was New Hampshire’s attorney general and a trial judge who later sat on the state’s supreme court.

Senate confirmation hearings to the high court were a breeze, because his federal experience was brief and his public stance on hot-button issues like abortion remained fuzzy.

“I have not got any agenda on what should be done with Roe v. Wade if that case were brought before me,” he told senators. “I will listen to both sides of that case. I have not made up my mind.”

That didn’t stop women’s rights groups from sounding the alarm. At rallies during his confirmation, abortion rights activists held up signs opposing Souter and chanted, “This is nobody’s body but mine.”

Similar concern came from movement conservatives. “At the time, he was called the ‘stealth candidate,’ ” said Douglas Kmiec, a law professor at Pepperdine University who worked on high court nominations in the Reagan and Bush administrations. “So it was tabula rasa when he showed up at the bench and it was a surprise thereafter.”

One of the first “surprises” came in 1992 when the Supreme Court reaffirmed the fundamental right to abortion in “Planned Parenthood v. Casey.” Souter was part of a three-justice coalition that ultimately decided the case. In doing so, the “no undue burden” legal test was established when states were considering limiting a woman’s access to abortion.

“What was clear to me was that he hadn’t decided that case before he heard it” at oral arguments, recalled Peter Rubin, one of Souter’s law clerks that term. “The law for him, unlike many of his conservative colleagues, was not an abstract set of rules totally divorced from its effect in the real world. It wasn’t just an intellectual puzzle for him.”

One puzzle for Souter was technology. He famously told Congress he would allow cameras in his courtroom only “over my dead body.”

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Posted in Uncategorized at 6:00 am by elliot

WASHINGTON (CNN) — David who? was the initial reaction of Americans to a little-known judge from New Hampshire named in 1990 to sit on the nation’s highest court. Even the nominee didn’t know what to think when President George H.W. Bush called him with the news, telling supporters, “I was in a state of virtual shock.”

Conservatives say Supreme Court Justice David Souter, nominated by a Republican, was a dissapointment.

Conservatives say Supreme Court Justice David Souter, nominated by a Republican, was a dissapointment.

Now, more than 18 years later, Souter plans to retire after the current term recesses in June, a source close to Souter told CNN.

David Hackett Souter had only been on a federal appeals court bench for a few months when he was tapped to replace liberal lion William Brennan, a choice many Republicans hoped would move the high court rightward and reshape American law.

“I think that is good news for all of us who are committed to the Constitution of the United States,” said Bush. “He’ll be a superb justice for the Supreme Court.”

In reality, Souter was in many ways a typical, old-fashioned Yankee Republican — a moderate with an independent, even quirky streak. Whether he became more liberal in his views after joining the Supreme Court, as many conservatives believe, may depend on your politics.

“Justice Souter will never escape the label of having been an enormous disappointment, a traitor to the right,” said Thomas Goldstein, a Washington appellate attorney and founder of Scotusblog.com. “It instead created the opportunity to entrench a series of more liberal rulings. So he became the right’s greatest failure and we will forever hear the mantra ‘No More Souters’ from conservatives.”

Colleagues dismiss suggestions that liberal colleagues on the bench helped move Souter to the left.

“I find that incredibly unbelievable,” said Rebecca Tushnet, a former Souter law clerk and professor at Georgetown Law Center. “He was faced with different issues on the Supreme Court than he was as a state official. A Supreme Court justice requires you to make different decisions, ones that aren’t always consistent with your politics. And remember the Republican Party of Nixon is a different party than the one we have today, and we have a number of judges who came out of that earlier Republican Party who may not be in line with the priorities of people in power in Republican circles today.”

The stealth candidate

Souter had a long career in public service. He was New Hampshire’s attorney general and a trial judge who later sat on the state’s supreme court.

Senate confirmation hearings to the high court were a breeze, because his federal experience was brief and his public stance on hot-button issues like abortion remained fuzzy.

“I have not got any agenda on what should be done with Roe v. Wade if that case were brought before me,” he told senators. “I will listen to both sides of that case. I have not made up my mind.”

That didn’t stop women’s rights groups from sounding the alarm. At rallies during his confirmation, abortion rights activists held up signs opposing Souter and chanted, “This is nobody’s body but mine.”

Similar concern came from movement conservatives. “At the time, he was called the ‘stealth candidate,’ ” said Douglas Kmiec, a law professor at Pepperdine University who worked on high court nominations in the Reagan and Bush administrations. “So it was tabula rasa when he showed up at the bench and it was a surprise thereafter.”

One of the first “surprises” came in 1992 when the Supreme Court reaffirmed the fundamental right to abortion in “Planned Parenthood v. Casey.” Souter was part of a three-justice coalition that ultimately decided the case. In doing so, the “no undue burden” legal test was established when states were considering limiting a woman’s access to abortion.

“What was clear to me was that he hadn’t decided that case before he heard it” at oral arguments, recalled Peter Rubin, one of Souter’s law clerks that term. “The law for him, unlike many of his conservative colleagues, was not an abstract set of rules totally divorced from its effect in the real world. It wasn’t just an intellectual puzzle for him.”

One puzzle for Souter was technology. He famously told Congress he would allow cameras in his courtroom only “over my dead body.”

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Posted in Uncategorized at 6:00 am by elliot

WASHINGTON (CNN) — David who? was the initial reaction of Americans to a little-known judge from New Hampshire named in 1990 to sit on the nation’s highest court. Even the nominee didn’t know what to think when President George H.W. Bush called him with the news, telling supporters, “I was in a state of virtual shock.”

Conservatives say Supreme Court Justice David Souter, nominated by a Republican, was a dissapointment.

Conservatives say Supreme Court Justice David Souter, nominated by a Republican, was a dissapointment.

Now, more than 18 years later, Souter plans to retire after the current term recesses in June, a source close to Souter told CNN.

David Hackett Souter had only been on a federal appeals court bench for a few months when he was tapped to replace liberal lion William Brennan, a choice many Republicans hoped would move the high court rightward and reshape American law.

“I think that is good news for all of us who are committed to the Constitution of the United States,” said Bush. “He’ll be a superb justice for the Supreme Court.”

In reality, Souter was in many ways a typical, old-fashioned Yankee Republican — a moderate with an independent, even quirky streak. Whether he became more liberal in his views after joining the Supreme Court, as many conservatives believe, may depend on your politics.

“Justice Souter will never escape the label of having been an enormous disappointment, a traitor to the right,” said Thomas Goldstein, a Washington appellate attorney and founder of Scotusblog.com. “It instead created the opportunity to entrench a series of more liberal rulings. So he became the right’s greatest failure and we will forever hear the mantra ‘No More Souters’ from conservatives.”

Colleagues dismiss suggestions that liberal colleagues on the bench helped move Souter to the left.

“I find that incredibly unbelievable,” said Rebecca Tushnet, a former Souter law clerk and professor at Georgetown Law Center. “He was faced with different issues on the Supreme Court than he was as a state official. A Supreme Court justice requires you to make different decisions, ones that aren’t always consistent with your politics. And remember the Republican Party of Nixon is a different party than the one we have today, and we have a number of judges who came out of that earlier Republican Party who may not be in line with the priorities of people in power in Republican circles today.”

The stealth candidate

Souter had a long career in public service. He was New Hampshire’s attorney general and a trial judge who later sat on the state’s supreme court.

Senate confirmation hearings to the high court were a breeze, because his federal experience was brief and his public stance on hot-button issues like abortion remained fuzzy.

“I have not got any agenda on what should be done with Roe v. Wade if that case were brought before me,” he told senators. “I will listen to both sides of that case. I have not made up my mind.”

That didn’t stop women’s rights groups from sounding the alarm. At rallies during his confirmation, abortion rights activists held up signs opposing Souter and chanted, “This is nobody’s body but mine.”

Similar concern came from movement conservatives. “At the time, he was called the ‘stealth candidate,’ ” said Douglas Kmiec, a law professor at Pepperdine University who worked on high court nominations in the Reagan and Bush administrations. “So it was tabula rasa when he showed up at the bench and it was a surprise thereafter.”

One of the first “surprises” came in 1992 when the Supreme Court reaffirmed the fundamental right to abortion in “Planned Parenthood v. Casey.” Souter was part of a three-justice coalition that ultimately decided the case. In doing so, the “no undue burden” legal test was established when states were considering limiting a woman’s access to abortion.

“What was clear to me was that he hadn’t decided that case before he heard it” at oral arguments, recalled Peter Rubin, one of Souter’s law clerks that term. “The law for him, unlike many of his conservative colleagues, was not an abstract set of rules totally divorced from its effect in the real world. It wasn’t just an intellectual puzzle for him.”

One puzzle for Souter was technology. He famously told Congress he would allow cameras in his courtroom only “over my dead body.”

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mgid.com

Posted in Uncategorized at 6:00 am by elliot

“In China’s Guangdong Province there’s been ‘almost miraculous’ progress in actually using stem cells to treat diseases such as brain injury, cerebral palsy, ataxia and other optic nerve damage, lower limb ischemia, autism, spinal muscular atrophy, and multiple sclerosis. One Chinese biotech company, Beike, is now building a 21,500 square foot stem cell storage facility and hiring professors from American universities such as Stanford. Two California families even flew their children to China for a cerebral palsy treatment that isn’t available in the US. The founder of Beike is so enthusiastic, he says his company is exploring the concept of using stem cells to extend longevity beyond 120 years.”

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Posted in Uncategorized at 6:00 am by elliot

Bob is a cool guy.

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Posted in Uncategorized at 6:00 am by elliot

And then there’s the further “oops” in ABC’s reporting:

But lost in much of the coverage was the fact that Mr. Kiriakou had no firsthand knowledge of the waterboarding: He was not actually in the secret prison in Thailand where Mr. Zubaydah had been interrogated but in the C.I.A. headquarters in Northern Virginia. He learned about it only by reading accounts from the field.

As Greg reports, ABC News has acknowledged the error, sort of.

The network’s concession is not a stand-alone correction — it appears in a news story that focuses largely on something else: The CIA’s use of private contractors to design the torture program….

ABC News’ correction appears almost in passing in the network’s new story. It mentions that the new memos show that waterboarding was used far more often than originally thought, adding that Zubaydah was waterboarded “at least 83 times.” It continues:

That contradicts what former CIA officer John Kiriakou, who led the Zubaydah capture team, told ABC News in 2007 when he first revealed publicly that waterboarding had been used.

ABC doesn’t mention the huge role played by original story in shaping the subsequent debate, and to my knowledge the network hasn’t said it regrets the error. While it’s good that ABC corrected the record, the damage of the original story has long since been done.

It’s not quite as bad as the journalistic horror that WaPo’s editorial page continues to be (Krauthammer: “Torture is an impermissible evil. Except under two circumstances.” I think the word impermissible doesn’t mean what Krauthammer thinks it means), but it’s bad enough. History is going to remember the Bush administration as the worst the nation ever experienced, and the go-along media that helped allow it to happen is going to be only slightly less tainted.

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Posted in Uncategorized at 6:00 am by elliot

GENEVA, Switzerland (CNN) — The number of confirmed swine flu cases across the globe kept rising Friday, but some signs of hope emerged in the battle against the worldwide outbreak.
Tourists sunbathe wearing surgical masks in the popular Mexican resort of Acapulco.

Tourists sunbathe wearing surgical masks in the popular Mexican resort of Acapulco.
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Scientists are working to develop vaccines to confront the flu, and one Mexican politician cited evidence that the virus is “letting up.”

The World Health Organization said Friday that the number of confirmed cases stood at 331. That number does not include 32 additional cases the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed in the United States, which brought the American total to 141.

The additional CDC cases would bring the worldwide total to 363 — and counting.

Meanwhile, researchers raced to develop a vaccine for swine flu, which is also known as 2009 H1N1.

The CDC hopes to have a vaccine to manufacturers within a month, said Michael Shaw, lab team leader for the H1N1 response at the CDC.

“We’re doing the best we can as fast as we can,” he said.

Yet it would take four to six months from the time the appropriate strain is identified before the first doses become available, said Dr. Marie-Paule Kieny, WHO director of the Initiative for Vaccine Research.

“Of course we would like to have a vaccine tomorrow. We would have wanted to have it yesterday,” she said. “It’s a long journey.”
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* iReport.com: iReports weigh in on swine flu

She said there is “no doubt” that a vaccine can be made “in a relatively short period of time.”

That optimism stems from scientists’ breakthroughs in developing other vaccines.

“The reality is that from the time the potentially pandemic virus is identified, it takes between 4 and 6 months to have the first doses of vaccine coming out of the factory and being available for immunizing people,” said Kieny.

The steps involved in producing a vaccine involve isolating a strain of the virus, which has already been done, and tweaking it so manufacturers can make a vaccine, Kieny said.

The tweaked virus will be shipped to manufacturers, who will fine-tune it. Then come more tests before national regulatory agencies decide whether to approve a vaccine.

As researchers work, at least one politician at the epicenter of the outbreak expressed optimism Friday.

Authorities in Mexico are “beginning to see evidence that the [virus] might be letting up, and the number of people who have been hospitalized has leveled out in regards to people who are contagious, at least as of yesterday,” Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard told reporters. Video Watch how Mexican authorities are dealing with the outbreak »

“I do not say this so that we lower our guard or so that we think that we do not have a problem anymore,” he said.

“We do have a problem, but I say this so that we know where we are as a city after we have done all we have done, and in what direction we are heading and how much we have progressed. And what I can say is that we are heading in the right direction.”

The WHO said Mexico has 156 confirmed cases and nine deaths. Mexican authorities say there have been 15 deaths, at least 358 confirmed cases, and more than 150 deaths suspected to have been caused by the flu. Video Watch Dr. Sanjay Gupta demystify pandemics »

The CDC gave the following state-by-state breakdown of confirmed H1N1 cases for the United States: Arizona, 4; California, 13; Colorado 2; Delaware, 4; Illinois, 3; Indiana, 3; Kansas, 2; Kentucky, 1; Massachusetts, 2; Michigan, 2; Minnesota, 1; Nebraska, 1; Nevada, 1; New Jersey, 5; New York, 50; Ohio, 1; South Carolina, 16; Texas, 28; and Virginia, 2. See where cases have been confirmed »

One death in the United States has been attributed to swine flu — a toddler from Mexico whose family brought him to Texas for medical treatment.

In a Cabinet meeting, President Obama on Friday praised the “extraordinary” government response to the virus but emphasized that “we also need to prepare for the long term.”

“Since we know that these kinds of threats can emerge at any moment, even if it turns out that the H1N1 is relatively mild on the front end, it could come back in a more virulent form during the actual flu season, and that’s why we are investing in our public health infrastructure.” Video Go behind the scenes at the CDC »

He said there are indications from Mexico that “relatively young, healthy people” have died rather than people whose immune systems are compromised and “that’s why we’re taking it seriously.”

“So I just want everybody to be clear that this is why this is a cause for concern but not alarm. We are essentially ensuring that, in the worst case scenario, we can manage this appropriately, government working with businesses and individuals, the private sector, and containing an outbreak and that we can, ultimately, get through this.”

In addition to Mexico and the United States, WHO said, the following countries have confirmed cases: Austria 1; Canada 34; Germany 3; Israel 2; Netherlands 1; New Zealand 3; Spain 13; Switzerland 1; and the United Kingdom, 8. Learn about the virus »

Health officials in Denmark and China each said Friday they had confirmed the first cases of swine flu in their respective countries, but the WHO has not yet confirmed those findings.

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Posted in Uncategorized at 6:00 am by elliot

Fook jew.

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Posted in Uncategorized at 5:59 am by elliot

Elliot Turner is a software entrepreneur located in Denver, Co.

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Posted in Uncategorized at 5:59 am by elliot

Fuck joo.

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